Military book author discusses forces of flight: How does Devil Dragon fly?

The military-aviation book “The Devil Dragon Pilot” focuses on a secret aircraft that can fly at unbelievable speeds with special engines. While not disclosing too much in this positing and ruining it for readers, I thought you might want to understand some of the basic components of an aircraft and some simple aerodynamic concepts.

There are four forces on an aircraft that is flying in level, unaccelerated flight. The forces are thrust, lift, weight, and drag. If one of them exceeds the other, the aircraft is out of balance. Which is ok, because that’s how an aircraft, balloon, glider, missile, or rocket flies through the air.

The forward thrust is generated by the engines, and in Devil Dragon’s case, there are more than one. This force overcomes the force of drag. Drag is a force that acts rearward, like a parachute, and is generated by a disruption of airflow by the wing, along with other things sticking out of an aircraft. The force drag is opposite of thrust.

The third force is weight, which is the total amount of the aircraft, along with fuel, weapons and aircrew. If you ever fly on a commercial carrier, you would include luggage, meal carts, and carry-on bags, too. The weight of the aircraft pulls it down because of….wait for it….wait…the force of gravity! The force of gravity is opposite of lift and pushes down through the center of gravity, known to pilots as the “CG”.

Most airplanes have the same major components to the airframe, too, and Devil Dragon is no different: wings, landing gear, fuselage, and an engine(s). You already inherently know these parts: fuselage is the main body of an airplane and is where you and the aircrew sit, along with your luggage; wings are the airfoils that are bolted to the sides of the fuselage that support the aircraft in flight; landing gear support the aircraft on the ground for take-off, landing, taxiing, and parking. You already know engines!

And that’s how Devil Dragon flies.  Read it today.

Question for readers: where is the fuel stored on an aircraft?

 

Gulfstream displaying wings, fuselage, and powerplant
Gulfstream jet displaying landing gear, wings, fuselage, and powerplant

 

 

Seeking Devil Dragon Pilot Readers!  Need your Aviation Photos for Instagram!

Based upon a reader’s idea (Bob Jefferies), I am seeking your photos taken from the air for The Devil Dragon Pilot Instagram account.

If you have cockpit or airborne photos you would like to submit, I’ll post for you, along with your name, onto the Instagram site. They can be air to ground, air to air, you in the cockpit, carrier based, or anything you feel fellow readers would like. Especially if you read the book, and have a great picture from one of the locations featured in a chapter!  Like this one from 45 Bistro Restaurant in Savannah, Georgia.  Thank you for your participation!

I think it’s a terrific idea, and I appreciate your input very much, Bob!

 

 

 

Military Aviation Novel “The Devil Dragon Pilot” Focuses on Decision-Making

In a recent conversation with a reader who was getting ready to finish “The Devil Dragon Pilot”, I was asked about decision-making in the cockpit. She asked me about how pilots know what to do and when, during a flight. My answer? It depends. As she read in the book, it also depended for both Ford Stevens and Wu Lee, too.

Ford Stevens, the main character in “The Devil Dragon”, follows the aeronautical decision-making process, known formally as ADM. It is decision-making in a very matchless environment, except for perhaps medicine and spaceflight. It is an organized and efficient set of steps of practice used by pilots to consistently control the best course of action. A pilot’s decision will be based upon the situation on the ground or in the air, and the information a pilot has at the time.

Consider all the items a pilot must think about: altitude, fuel, navigation, air traffic, radio calls, birds, weather, passengers and cargo, enemy fire, system malfunctions…the list goes on. While some is very systematic and checklist oriented and dictated by FAA policy and aviation law, other situations require solid judgment.

What is great about this mysterious ADM is that you can learn it. Time has demonstrated in the industry that you can learn to improve your decision-making through experience and critical thinking. The ADM process takes pilots through the decision-making in the cockpit and layouts out the steps to success:

These steps are known to pilots for good decision-making:

  1. Identifying your personal attitudes hazardous to safe flight
  2. Learning behavior modification techniques
  3. Learning how to recognize and cope with stress
  4. Developing risk assessment skills
  5. Using all resources available
  6. Evaluating the effectiveness of one’s ADM skills.

As you read “The Devil Dragon Pilot”, I think you will see the pilots going through these steps verbally.  In many scenes, I have written them into the characters as they are thinking and talking to themselves. If you look closely in the book, ADM is alive and well.

Get the book today on Amazon.com!

 

 

Make a good decision in this office.

  Make a good decision in this office.

Author Lawrence A. Colby Interviewed on Jerry Traughber’s Where Woodworking and Entrepreneurship Meet

November 6, 2016: I was honored to be interviewed for Mr. Jerry Traughber’s Design website titled “Where Woodworking and Entrepreneurship Meet” website.  Jerry is a motivated and avid reader, aggressive fan of military aircraft, and was kind enough to write about “The Devil Dragon Pilot” during two of his recent posts. Thank you for your kind words, Jerry!

 

Gulfstream G650ER (Photo by BillYoungImages.com)
Gulfstream G650ER (Photo by BillYoungImages.com)

Group Reading Guide

Get reading with your Book Club!  I’m happy to provide a Group Reading Guide for The Devil Dragon Pilot, one that can be downloaded and printed for your use.

It involves a few short Q&A questions, followed by ten (10) questions that you can use next time your Book Club meets.  The goal for the Guide is to help guide your talks and facilitate a great discussion about “The Devil Dragon Pilot”. The link can be found here.

For additional information about Book Clubs and how you can start one at work or in your community, click this link.

Jojo Rising!

 

#1 NY Times Best Selling Author and Financial Planner Ric Edelman to announce “The Devil Dragon Pilot” Book Release on National Radio Show

Ric Edelman, the #1 NY Times Best Selling Author and Financial Planner, will be announcing the release of “The Devil Dragon Pilot” on his national radio show in December! I’m honored, Ric! Thank you!

Our main character, Captain Ford Stevens, is a fan of Ric Edelman. In one scene, after getting picked up by the FBI in Washington, DC for “something”, Ford and two FBI agents listen to Ric together as Ric gives advice to a caller on how much cash savings the caller should have. You’ll soon read that although Ford Stevens follows Ric’s advice, he has more on his mind at the moment than cash.

Ric Edelman is a #1 New York Times bestselling author. With more than 1 million copies collectively in print, his eight books on personal finance have been translated into several languages and educated countless people worldwide. The Truth About Money was recognized with an Excellence in Financial Literacy Education (EIFLE) Book of the Year Award from the Institute for Financial Literacy (March 2011), a Gold Medal Axiom Award (March 2012), an Apex Award (June 2011), and was named Book of the Year by Small Press magazine (1997). The Lies About Money was awarded the Axiom Personal Finance Book of the Year (March 2008) and an EIFLE Award (October 2009). Ric’s eighth book, The Truth About Retirement Plans and IRAs, a #1 national best-seller, was published in April 2014.

Ric’s radio show has been on the air for more than 20 years and is heard throughout the country. In 2014, 2015 and 2016, Ric was named among the “Heavy Hundred” in the radio industry by TALKERS magazine. Ric’s television show, The Truth About Money with Ric Edelman, airs on more than 200 public television stations across the country and has won 8 Telly Awards.

Thanks, again, Ric!

 

Aviation Book Features Gulfstream G650ER

The book “The Devil Dragon Pilot” features a variety of U.S. and Chinese military aircraft, but one corporate aircraft that I write about extensively is the Gulfstream 650ER. Fictionally borrowed from Corning, Inc. of Corning, New York, our main character Captain Ford Stevens does some remarkable stuff with this jet.

This model of the Gulfstream is their newest aircraft, and can extend the reach of the aircraft to 7,500 miles without stopping. Not only is that an impressive distance, but that is non-stop, flying at Mach 0.85. The jet can comfortably fit 19 passengers, sleep up to 10, have a maximum takeoff weight of 103,000+ pounds, and cruise at 51,000 feet mean sea level. Impressive performance in the pilot and passenger worlds.

 

Front view of the G650ER (Photo-BillYoungImage.com)
Front view of the G650ER (Photo-BillYoungImage.com)

 

The outstanding presentation of this jet is extraordinary to non-pilots and pilots alike. This extended range alone, to put it in perspective, makes it possible to fly from Hong Kong to Washington, DC, or Singapore to Houston, without stopping for fuel. Gulfstream pilots tell me no other jet has this combo of speed, aircraft performance, passenger load and distance, and is a real pleasure to fly.

The interior, which is featured extensively in “The Devil Dragon Pilot” in multiple scenes, provides extreme quietness, comfort, and luxury. Many configurations of the jet are available, from conference rooms to private bedrooms to leather couches. The 16 windows allow a terrific view of the sky above and earth below. Can you imagine having a shower in your jet? Yes, Gulfstream can make you one.

 

Looking out the passenger window on the G650ER (Photo-BillYoungImages.com)
Looking out the passenger window on the G650ER (Photo-BillYoungImage.com)

 

The cabin circulates 100% fresh air every two minutes, which helps cut down on jet lag. What also helps is that the cabin altitude is at only 4,000 feet, which helps all on board feel great as everyone crosses multiple time zones.

What also comes into play for Ford Stevens is the onboard technology. Without giving away too much to readers that have not read “The Devil Dragon Pilot” yet, Gulfstream has generated an extensive Cabin Management System that allows passengers and crew to control lighting, window shades, temperature and other “things” with their Apple iOS smartphone. This technology will provide the reader with a very exciting scene while airborne!

 

Cockpit (Photo-BillYoungImages.com)
Cockpit (Photo-BillYoungImage.com)

 

Lastly, the cockpit is a dream to any pilot. If there was a pyramid of aircraft on any pilot’s wish list to fly, this G650ER is at the top. The technical, high-end avionics and glass instrumentation help the aircrew fly and navigate to nearly anywhere on earth. Her onboard computers work with the Captain and First Officer in creating a smooth, safe flight for all. The large format screens give the crew the ability to move flight information information and instrumentation around, depending on what stage of flight they are in, right down to touchdown landing, rollout, parking, and shutdown. Impressive to say the least.

 

Head-Up Display (Photo-BillYoungImages.com)
Head-Up Display (Photo-BillYoungImage.com)

 

My friend and professional photographer Bill Young was kind enough to share some of his professional photos with me. Please visit his website at www.BillYoungImage.com if you would like to see some of his outstanding photographs.

The last portion I’ll mention about this G650ER jet is that I modified it a bit after reading about the great work being done at Gulfstream Special Missions in Savannah, Georgia. This office has the capability to custom modify any Gulfstream jet to a customer’s specifications. From Space Shuttle simulators to atmosphere studies to military missions, this special office deserves the title Special Missions.

Needless to say, Ford Stevens, Gulfstream and Corning Corporate take care of business!  Read it on December 10, 2016!

Author Lawrence A. Colby Interviewed on “Ready For Take-Off Podcast”

I had the honor and privilege of talking about aviation on the Ready For Takeoff Podcast with Captain George Nolly recently.  We discussed everything from military flight training to the C-130 to the upcoming release of The Devil Dragon Pilot.

George Nolly launched his aviation career at 17 while still in high school. An appointment to the Air Force Academy prepared him for his two tours in Vietnam, flying O-2s over the Ho Chi Minh trail in Laos and F-4 Phantoms over Hanoi. After his service, George went into commercial aviation, flying for United Airlines as Captain and Flight Instructor for 26 years. After finishing his Doctorate in Homeland Security, George went on to conduct airline safety audits for the for International Air Transport Association on carriers throughout the globe. George continues to instruct on the Boeing 777.

Thanks, George, for allowing me to speak with you about The Devil Dragon Pilot book.  Readers, please check out George Nolly’s Ready For Takeoff podcast on iTunes now to hear this latest interview.

Thank you, George!

 

Read For Take-Off Podcast
Ready For Take-Off Podcast

 

iTunes